Myth of the Day: 3 Heartbreaking Jesus Virgins Saints Crying Blood Tears

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MYTH:

The Catholic church and some of its followers believe in the myth that some saints and virgins have cried blood. They make statues of them with blood tears rolling down the faces made of ceramic or plaster.

Myth of the day

Many catholics report sightings of weeping madonnas, from Ireland to Croatia, but the only one recognised by the Church is a statue of the Virgin Mary in the town of Siracusa in Sicily. It began weeping in 1953, so they say.

FACT:

There is actually a symptom known as  haemolacria, which is a rare condition that causes a person to produce tears that are partially composed of blood. The condition has garnered significant attention in the medical community and media recently.

Myth of the Day: 3 Heartbreaking Jesus Virgins Saints Crying Blood Tears 1

Haemolacria is a symptom of multiple diseases involving the conjunctiva and lacrimal system.

These entities can range from vascular malformations and tumors to infectious or inflammatory conditions and has even been reported in the literature as a presenting finding in scleral buckle infection.

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Excellent Article It will Blow Your Mind Suicide Through the Cracks: The one the system missed — takingthemaskoff

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Excellent Article It will Blow Your Mind Suicide Through the Cracks: The one the system missed — takingthemaskoff 2

I survived a suicide attempt. However my friend, he did not. This is what suicide looks like. This is him after hanging himself, right before he died. February 25th 2010. The difference between us is nothing, except our resources—--Malcolm Gladwell

By Cortland Pfeffer

There is enormous stigma associated with the word “suicide.” People cringe when you even mention the word and immediately change the subject. If we are afraid to talk about it, how on earth do we think we are going to prevent it? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, taking more than 40,000 per year. At this rate, in one decade, we lose 400,000 people to suicide – equivalent to the entire population of Oakland, California.

When someone is suicidal, the typical reaction is “don’t talk like that!” or “that’s not even funny.” Or it turns to simplifying the situation such as, “other people have it worse than you,” or “just snap out of it, things will get better.” Nobody wants to “deal with it” and most people will adamantly refuse to even discuss it. You may even be considered selfish for having those thoughts and leaving close ones behind.

But when suicide does occur, the response is quite the opposite. Suddenly, everyone is there and feels terrible. They did not see the signs, never saw it coming, and can only talk about the amazing qualities of the deceased. It even goes as far as to hear people saying, “why didn’t they just reach out?”

If anyone has ever lost someone to suicide, they know the tremendous amount of pain associated. There may not be a worse feeling in the world. There are so many unanswered questions, “what ifs”, and “Should haves”. In the end, nobody commits suicide because they want to die, they commit suicide because they want the pain to go away.

I was suicidal, Joe committed suicide.

Part of the reason Joe is dead is because of the stigma associated with suicide along with the professionals he worked with that neglected and labeled him. He did not get treated as he deserved.

Joe didn’t have money, my family did. He went to jail and stayed long-term, I went to jail and got bailed out. He stayed in jail, while I was offered treatment instead. His crimes were all non-violent drug possession charges, mine were DUI, assault, and disorderly.

The difference? I had money and resources. Based on the information in the paragraph above, is there any other reason for the difference in penalties?

Joe and I were also born with the same temperament, which is more in tune with others emotions and greater sensitivity. This is neither good nor bad, just the way we were born. This is not to say that being emotional is guaranteed to create issues.

To be on this far end of the spectrum, along with consistently being denied needed support, along with the unhealthy environment is a formula for addiction. They refer to this as the biopsychosocial model. The biology is the genetics, the psychological refers to the emotional neglect and trauma, and the sociological refers to growing up in a broken home, overpopulated schools with minimal resources, poverty, and lack of positive role models.

via Suicide Through the Cracks: The one the system missed — takingthemaskoff