This is Where Cinnamon Comes From Beautiful Trees and 1 Recipe

CINNAMON TREE

 

cinnamon dra martha castro noriega tijuana mexico

 

Cinnamon

Cinnamomum zeylanicum, evergreen tree of the laurel family (Lauraceae) native to(Ceylon), Malabar Coast and Myanmar (Burma), also cultivated in South America and the West Indies for the spice consisting of its dried inner bark.

cinnamon dra martha castro noriega tijuana mexico

 

It was once more valuable than gold. In Egypt it was sought for embalming and witchcraft.

In medieval Europe it was used for religious rites and as a flavoring. Later it was the most-profitable spice in the Dutch East India Company trade. In modern times it is used to flavor a variety of foods and drinks; in Europe and the it is especially popular in bakery goods.

 

cinnamon dra martha castro tijuana mexico

 

RECIPE (double or triple amounts of each ingredient for more people)

  • Cinnamon

  • 2 teaspoons of honey

  • 1/4 of a lemon

  • 1 cup of water

 

Step 1 –
Boil in 1 cup of water. Pour the boiling water on the cinnamon. Cover it and let it seep until it is warm enough to drink.

 

Step 2 –
Add honey when the water is cool. Drink 1/2 of this before going to bed.

 

Step 3 –
The other half should be covered and refrigerated and this should be consumed in the morning. Do not re-heat it in the morning.

FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM

 

Detecting Hidden Blood Stains in Crime Scenes like in NYPD BLue show or Real Life Interesting Fact

Detecting Hidden Blood Stains in Crime Scenes like in NYPD BLue show or Real Life Interesting Fact 1

All these years watching several TV cop shows, like, NYPD Blue and Law and Order, seeing them grab this fluorescent blue light lamp on a crime scene to show blood stains, well, I just found out this is not true nor accurate in real life crime investigations. It was invented for our amusement only!

It is interesting to learn this fact from a reliable source,  a Criminal Justice Forensic agent retired now: Don Penven

Detecting Hidden Blood Stains in Crime Scenes like in NYPD BLue show or Real Life Interesting Fact 2

If you watch many of the TV “Cop” shows, you will see at some point those working a crime scene using a blue light in search of invisible blood (blood stains that were cleaned up). Shazam! Blue-white stains appear all over the floors, walls and objects sitting around the crime scene! But in reality—this cannot happen. You see, blood does not fluoresce by applying UV or visible blue light.

Blood, even minute quantities that remain after clean-up, can be made to “luminesce;” that is, by spraying certain chemicals such as Luminol, BlueStar or Fluorescene on the various surfaces, blood will luminesce, or simply “glow in the dark”—and adding blue light is not necessary. So what can alternate light sources reveal? Although blood does not fluoresce, certain other physiological fluids will. UV alternate light sources can reveal the following: seminal fluid, saliva and urine stains. Also, certain narcotics will fluoresce as will bone and teeth fragments.

YOU CAN READ MORE HERE