4 German Traveling Beautiful Rarities to See and Admire

GERMAN BEAUTIFUL RARITIES:

UPDATE to add more wonderful pictures!

The lakes and wetlands along the coastlines are important stopover points for many migrating birds. The government has set up reserves for the birds’ protection.

 

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Germany is full of famous, spectacular things to explore. However, if you venture beyond the tourist attractions, you would discover a side to the I Its beauty that is quirky, astonishing, and sometimes even downright weird but wonderfully unique.

 

Kunsthofpassage Singing Drain Pipes

 

german traveling

 

Fraurenkirche, Nuremburg, 500 year old church

 

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The Thousand Year Old Year Bush

 

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Upside-Down House

 

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The world’s narrowest alley, Spreuerhofstrasse

 

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Kunstforum Ostdeutsche Galerie 

 

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Beautiful Rarities to See in Paris France

Beneath the opera house, Palais Garnier, there sits a water tank, and some folks say that once a man lived there who had no face. “The Phantom of the Opera” was based upon this place. The inspiration for Gaston Leroux’s Phantom of the Opera.

Water Tank beneath Palais Garnier

“The Phantom of the Opera”

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The Floating Hotel on the Seine

 

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Belvedere of the Dordogne Jardin Extraordinaire: Marqueyssac.
6 kilometers of paths in a maze of 150,000 box-wood
Plants carefully trimmed by hand!

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Sinking House of Montmartre

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Beautiful Nature in my Yard from Caterpillars to Butterflies

Caterpillars come in a variety of colors, shapes and sizes. Their beauty can often be deceiving since their hairs often contain venom which can be poisonous to humans and predators. Toxic caterpillars can be found in many places including backyard gardens, parks and fields.

MONARCH CATERPILLAR

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HICKORY TUSSOCK MOTH CATERPILLAR

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CINNABAR MOTH CATERPILLAR

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BLUE LADY CATERPILLAR

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Travel to Europe in Autumn Germany Austria Dubai Spain

AUTUMN IS  ONE OF THE BEST TIMES OF YEAR TO TRAVEL TO EUROPE

I usually pack my luggage now and make preparations to travel to Europe, but make no mistake, I have to come back to my neck of the woods to take care of things and then go back to traveling.

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So I actually travel twice in Autumn. I like to combine my travel destinations with my autumn medical conferences I plan to go to this time of the year.

BAVARIA 2017

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My favorite places to visit in Europe are Germany (Bavaria, I love it!), Austria and Dubai. But the second time I return to the EU I like to explore at least a new city I haven’t been. This time I want to go to the South of Spain to enjoy the Moroccan culture too.

AUSTRIA

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AUSTRIA HALLSTATT

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Orphaned elephants have a tougher social life

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David Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage

Young female orphan elephants have a tougher social life than non-orphans, a new study suggests, adding to a growing body of evidence of how the impacts of poaching cascade through elephant societies.

The research, part of a wider study by Save The Elephants and Colorado State University into the social impact of adult mortality on orphaned female elephants, shows that orphans receive more aggression from other elephants — whether overt aggression like pushing or more subtle forms like displacements — than non-orphans.

Orphans that leave their families and move into another family unit are likely to receive more aggression than those integrated in their natal groups.

The study, conducted over five years and led by CSU postdoctoral researcher Shifra Goldenberg, analyzes the social interaction patterns of juvenile female elephants in Northern Kenya who have lost their mothers to either poaching or natural mortality. The work shows that orphans are resilient, and rebuild their social lives by strengthening relationships in response to maternal mortality.

“Elephants live in matriarchs that facilitate access to limited resources like food, water, and shade,” said Goldenberg, who is also a researcher with Save The Elephants. “We found that orphaning and natal group dispersal may trigger resource opportunity costs for young females, as they appear to be subordinate to other group members. What this means for their long-term survival and reproduction remains an open question.”

While the research team found that orphans rebuild their social networks, scientists also saw that orphans’ social lives do not return to normal. While they maintain rich and varied relationships with other elephants — relatives and non-relatives — they have markedly less interaction with adult females. This reduces access to favored foods and resources, as well as to the elders, whose experience is critical to the transmission of information between generations in elephant societies.

The latest findings around elephant aggression shed new light on the substantial indirect impact of poaching on orphan survivors, demonstrating that socially disadvantaged elephant orphans have a tougher life than non-orphans.

Between 2009 and 2013, the population of elephants in Samburu and Buffalo Springs National Reserves in Northern Kenya, where the study was conducted, was hit by increased ivory poaching and a severe drought that left many young elephants orphaned, without mothers or grandmothers.

Some orphans chose to remain with what is left of their disrupted groups, others left their natal group to attach to unrelated individuals. Still others became drifters, showing some social preference but not fully committing to any one group.

The researchers found that only orphans from disrupted families tend to disperse into new social groups but that during feeding, these same elephants receive more aggression than orphans in natal groups.

George Wittemyer, study co-author and an associate professor in the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at CSU said that the recovery of elephant populations from prolonged ivory poaching will depend largely on the ability of young females to successfully reconstruct their social lives and family groups.

“Deep, life-long bonds are the fundamental component of elephant societies, said Wittemyer, who also serves as chairman of the Scientific Board of Save The Elephants. “Fine resolution studies like these allow us to gauge the response of young females to human driven disruption.”

In the coming years the Samburu orphan study will relate the social costs of being an orphan to fitness as this could be important to the recovery of elephant populations affected by the ivory trade and other forms of disruption.

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Materials provided by Colorado State UniversityNote: Content may be edited for style and length.
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LAKE COMO ITALY One of the most beautiful lakes in the world

Lake Como, Italy

LAKE COMO ITALY One of the most beautiful lakes in the world 24

LAKE COMO ITALY One of the most beautiful lakes in the world 25

LAKE COMO ITALY One of the most beautiful lakes in the world 26

LAKE COMO ITALY One of the most beautiful lakes in the world 27

Even in a country filled with delights, Lake Como sits at the top of many wish lists for travelers visiting Italy. A popular retreat for aristocrats and the wealthy going back to Roman times, this Y-shaped lake continues to exert a powerful pull on imaginations thanks to the historic villas, stunning gardens, sleepy villages, and Belle Époque–era resorts lining its shores, not to mention the jaw-dropping views of the Alps.