Goodreads Book of the Day Life and Death of War Correspondent Marie Colvin

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In Extremis: The Life and Death of the War Correspondent Marie Colvin

Marie Colvin, the headmost war reporter of her generation was killed in Syria in 2012 at age 56 by an IED (Improvised Explosive Device). The world of journalism lost a great and iconoclastic correspondent, a fearless female who covered  the most destructive global calamities of our times.

 

She lost an eye when she was reporting in Sri Lanka at the end of the civil war. She interviewed Gaddafi twice, and risked her life covering conflict in Chechnya, East Timor, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, and Zimbabwe.

Her personal life was highly interesting as it was her professional one: extremely motivated, bold and unpredictable. She married several times, drank heavily, suffered from PTSD and never allowed anyone to box her into what society expects from women’s roles.

In Extremis: The Life and Death of War Correspondent Marie Colvin by Lindsey Hilsum

Goodreads Book of the Day Life and Death of War Correspondent Marie Colvin 1

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1 Dalai Lama Quote to Live By Life-Changing Inspirational

Dalai Lama Quotes are Inspirational!

 

You own your life. Don’t let other to bring you down!

Dalai Lama quotes

We can’t control what other people do, say or think.  We can’t make someone else act with honesty, loyalty, integrity. All we can control is our behaviour and act with good morals and respect.

When someone else does something dishonest, disrespectful or unkind we can only control our reaction to it. Sometimes walking away is the best thing to do to avoid aggressive behaviour. The way we conduct ourselves in rough times is the way we show the kind of person that we are.

 

EVEN AN ADORABLE CAT KNOWS … LOL

1 Dalai Lama Quote to Live By Life-Changing Inspirational 2

Unfortunately we live in a world where there are some people who will lash out at others in jealousy, envy, hate or greed or plain old meanness.  And no matter how good a person you are, there will always be those who try to tear you down as best they can.

Always have in mind that regardless of what anyone else does or says, we can always choose to take the high road. We can always choose to continue to act with integrity and kindness.  And at the end of the day it is taking that high road that will bring us inner peace, even among the havoc and turmoil that others may try to create.

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One of my Many Pet Peeves Troop vs Trooper or Soldier

One of my Many Pet Peeves Troop vs Trooper or Soldier 3

English is not my native language, Spanish is. I also speak Italian, Portuguese and I am fluent one hundred percent in all these languages. But I admit that I make typos and several mistakes when I write in my non-native languages, but I always try to learn and speak better, even in Spanish and I am always willing to learn from my mistakes. That is why I am a serious critic of misconduct in expressions in the languages mentioned above.

So here it goes, my pet peeve of today: Troop VS Trooper

I often hear reporters on American TV channels talking about “troops”. The first time when I listened to that word being misused was when the war in Afghanistan was being announced by different TV reporters back in October 2001.

They were mentioning the amount of “troops” that President George Bush was sending. I was astonished! They said ten thousand of them were parting from USA. So I started to make my own calculations and said well, if a troop has a minimum of 3 to 5 platoons;

One platoon has 2 to 4 squads, and each squad has 10 to 14 troopers or soldiers, then a platoon has about 50 soldiers, then a troop has a minimum of 250 men. If President George Bush was sending 10,000 troops then he was sending about 2, 500,000 (two and a half million) soldiers or troopers!

And next week they said more “troops” were leaving to the Middle East. By then I knew how erroneous and non-well educated in their own language they were: when they were saying “troops” they were referring to a singular, to one man, which is wrong.

For some English speakers a “trooper” is a mounted soldier. For others, a “trooper” is a policeman who patrols the roads of a U.S. state in a car.

As to “how a plural word becomes singular,” the answer has to be “by being used that way.”

However, just because a usage is widespread or has been added to a dictionary doesn’t mean that it is worth adopting.

Orwell’s objection to the use of inflated Latin words applies to the use of troop to stand for soldier.

The worst thing of all is that 17 years have gone by and I still hear it and read it. I can´t stop stupidity!